The voices of EHPs: in print & podcast

Yesterday was a landmark for aspiring EH researchers like me with the publication of the summary of Professor Steve Tombs’ research on EHPs and the broadcasting of parts of this research on BBC Radio 5 Live followed by a wider debate on food safety and the limits of risk regulation.

Publication is free from here: http://tinyurl.com/zvvetgz

BBC Radio 5 Live Investigates podcast here (available for 29 days): http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b078xdqf

Both illustrate why research matters and provided important critiques of what’s happening to local government EHPs, why it’s happening and what front line EHPs think about it. In particular I take my hat off to those EHPs who contributed to the radio programme with their fears and concerns for the public’s health. I think it says a lot about what’s happening in local government that many were afraid to go on the record for fear of losing their jobs.

My hope is that this research and coverage will be harder to ignore and could give EHPs more confidence to speak out and thereby lead to a more informed and critical debate about what’s happening in local government environmental health services. My fear is that we won’t make time to engage for many reasons, not least our desire to get on with (and keep) our jobs and not to upset our seniors and those who claim to represent us.

Our cause is becoming clearer by the day, recruiting for environmental health rebels here…

With best wishes,

Rob

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “The voices of EHPs: in print & podcast

  1. The debate continues with an informative Q&A by Tom Wall with @steve_tombs on his recent research in latest EHN-Online: http://tinyurl.com/hozetpu

    We’ve also heard that his research is on the agenda for discussion at next week’s CIEH Research and Strategy Group, a promising development.

    With best wishes, Rob

  2. Think it is really important to engage private sector EHPs (those that represent business interests) and make the point that their future will be influenced by (maybe even depends upon) the strength of the public sector representation.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s